Archive for the Firearms Category

C96 M30 Broomhandle Mauser

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , on June 29, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgFlag_of_the_Republic_of_ChinaThis is a M30 variant of the Mauser C96 semi-automatic pistol in 7.3mm calibre. The serial number of this example puts it around 1932. It has the three chinese characters on the magazine indicating it was for the Nationalist Chinese contract. The barrel is the standard 140mm length. Somewhere along the last 80 years it has acquired a commercial stock by Geha. Along with this one, I show below my 1920 regulation police rework with fixed sights and the short barrel. I would rate the condition of this one as tired, I have since cleaned it with a copper brush and it’s looking a lot better, but the ex-China ones are always beaters.

Japanese Type-14 Nambu Pistol

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , on April 16, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_Japan.svgThis is the Nambu Type-14 semi-automatic pistol. This pistol was produced from 1925 until 1945. This example has the digits 19.5 stamped into the frame. This is the year and month of manufacture. In this case you add 19 to 1925, the first year of the Showa Emperor. This gets you to 1944. May is the fifth month so the pistol was produced in May 1944. The manufacturer is Toriimatsu and this pistol is from the second series. 1944 was the high point in the manufacture of this pistol so the 19.5 is pretty common. These pistols a terribly ugly and have a bad reputation for shooting their owners. The ammunition, 8mm Nambu, is almost unobtainium.

M38 Carcano Infantry Carbine

Posted in Firearms with tags , , on April 14, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_Italy_(1861-1946)The Fucile di Fanteria Mod. 1938. The standard short rifle adopted by the Italian Army in 1938. The rifle is in 7.35×51 calibre. This one is a bit of a bush pig, rough but cheap. It was manufactured by Terni in 1939. The 7.35 round was adopted to give the Italians a heavier hitting round than the prior 6.5 Carcano. The rifle was unusual for incorporating a detachable folding bayonet, seen below or here.

 

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Partisans of the Slovenian Cancarjeve Brigade in Ljubljana in May 1943. The rifles are captured Italiam Carcano M38’s.

G33/40 Mountain Carbine

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , on November 18, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svg800px-Flag_of_Czechoslovakia Next up on the wall is a sweet, all matching, G33/40 Mountain Carbine. These rifles were essentially a German copy of the vz33 but considerably lightened by scavenging metal from any place they could find on the rifle to remove. Note the hollow bolt. The rifle is also characterised by the plate that extends up the stock from the butt plate. This was intended to protect the rifle from damage due to being used as a walking stick. The rifle, in addition to being issued to Gebirgsjäger, was also issued to any light infantry such as the Fallschirmjäger. Known for their brutal kick and excessive flash due to the light weight and short barrel, these were only made between 1940 and 42. The 945 code here is the early code for Brno, later it changed to dot.

Arisaka Type-99 Infantry Rifle

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , on October 22, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_Japan.svgThe latest rifle in the box, a beautiful Type 99 infantry rifle in as found condition. This rifle was intended to replace the smaller caliber Type-38 found here. The 7.7mm round was found to be more effective at dropping the enemy and less likely to be deflected by light cover. This example comes with its original monopod and anti-aircraft sights as well as an intact Chrysanthemum. Brilliant! Ammunition for this can be seen here. The rifle was manufactured at the Nagoya Arsenal in mid to late 1943. It is a 4th series example and was one of the last to have the monopod fitted.

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Japanese soldier using the Type-99 during the occupation of Indochina, 1940

1939 Mauser K98 Infantry Rifle

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , , on August 24, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgHere’s a great shooter Kar-98 that I recovered a couple of weeks go. Originally manufactured by Berlin-Lübecker Maschinenfabrik in 1939, the rifle is matching numbers in it’s action and barrel. The rifle came to me as a shooter in a monte-carlo stock and I had an empty early wood set in the gun box just for this reason.

The stock all matches itself except for the end cap which is an Erma manufactured cap from the right period. So a stock mismatch but great for a shooter. You will note the “Germany” stamped into the barrel. This indicates a post-1968 import mark.

The stock is devoid of dirty birds so I expect that it is a Norwegian post-war reuse set. Still beats a Russian capture but not in the same rank as a fully matched rifle like my other one here.

Italian M91/41 Rifle

Posted in Firearms with tags , , on July 1, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_Italy_(1861-1946)This is what happens when you start running low on German rifles to buy. You start branching out a little. I say a little because this is still a WW2 Axis weapon but I realise I am drifting to the dark side.

This rifle is a 1941 dated M91/41 long rifle (fucile) in 6.5×52 calibre, manufactured by FAT (Terni). All matching, only thrown into a ditch once! No honestly, it’s a ugly Mannlicher like rifle that doesn’t deserve its post-war reputation for poor accuracy. Most of that comes from undersized commercial rounds fed to the surplus market. This example has its original straight bolt. I have read that unscrupulous importers bent the bolts on these rifles hoping to confuse buyers into thinking they were “Italian Mausers”.