German Propaganda Poster

Posted in Paper, Propaganda Items with tags , , , , on April 16, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgVery cool items here. This is a pair of medium sized posters I obtained from Henrik in Germany. He told me that a civil servant has retired who had found these in storage in the 70’s. Crisp edges, appropriate spotting, all as you would expect. The text translates to “One People, One Nation, One Leader”. The poster was printed by the offset printer Carl Werner of Reichenbach. By the way, fuck Hitler!

Japanese Nambu Holster

Posted in Holsters with tags , , , , on April 16, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_Japan.svgThis holster is manufactured to fit the Nambu Type 14 that I just imported from the States. The holster is made from rubberized canvas. In my experience Japanese leather was just terrible quality and little of it survived use. This material was substituted as it resisted the damp of the S.E.Asia battlefield much better. It’s marked with kanji inside but I have no idea what it says. I’ll be off to the internet to find out. The holster has a small pouch in the front for storing a 15 round carton of 8mm pistol ammunition. The cleaning rod is missing, something else for me to rectify.

The holster has two rows of kanji inside the flap. I am an idiot and have the photo upside down but basically the first row starts with “sho”, short for Showa, the emperors name. Then there is the kanji for the number 10 followed by a 5 or a 9. This would mean 1940 or 1944. 1940 is too early for one of these canvas holsters so it must be 1944. Then below is the mark for the Nagoya Arsenal and finally an acceptance mark.

Panzerschreck Front Sight

Posted in Parts & Accessories with tags , , , on April 16, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgMissing from my Panzerschreck rebuild was the adjustable front sight. Luckily Bergflak, a fellow on the internet here, had made some up to fit his own Panzerschreck. I got him to send me one and here we go.

A Birchall In Victorian Egypt

Posted in 1850-1900 Medals, Family Groups & Singles with tags , , , , on April 15, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_United_KingdomA nice tidy Anglo-Egyptian War group belonging to one of the Birchall/Burchell/Birchell’s out there. This one is impressed to H.T.BURCHELL PTE. R.M.L.I. Harry Thomas Burchell (No 2473) enlisted in the Chatham Division of the Royal Marines on June 11th 1883. He served until discharged on 6th November, 1894. The Egypt medal has bars for Suakin (1st March to 14th May, 1885) and Tofrek (22nd March 1885). I have another Birchall from the same campaign here.

M38 Carcano Infantry Carbine

Posted in Firearms with tags , , on April 14, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_Italy_(1861-1946)The Fucile di Fanteria Mod. 1938. The standard short rifle adopted by the Italian Army in 1938. The rifle is in 7.35×51 calibre. This one is a bit of a bush pig, rough but cheal. It was manufactured by Terni in 1939. The 7.35 round was adopted to give the Italians a heavier hitting round than the prior 6.5 Carcano. The rifle was unusual for incorporating a detachable folding bayonet, seen below or here.

Borci_Cankarjeve_brigade_na_Čatežu

Partisans of the Slovenian Cancarjeve Brigade in Ljubljana in May 1943. The rifles are captured Italiam Carcano M38’s.

A Birchall in the Malaya Campaign

Posted in 1945 + Medals, Family Groups & Singles with tags , , , on April 14, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_United_KingdomIn my never-ending quest to find all the Birchall or similar named groups and singles on the internets, there is this example in the post this week. Named to 23416889 SIGMN.J.I.BIRCHELL R.SIGS., it is a EIIR General Service Medal with a bar for the Malayan campaign against the communist insurgency. This post-colonial bush war ran from 1948 to 1960 and was one of the few successful attempts to keep the communists out of S.E.Asia.

Italian Folding M38 Bayonet

Posted in Bayonets with tags , , on April 14, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_Italy_(1861-1946)This is a cool, totally impractical and typically Italian bit of kit. It is the short folding bayonet intended for the Carcano M38 Carbine. I really don’t understand what they were trying to achieve here, avoiding inventory that may be lost, making their troops faster to get stabby. Either way it was a failure, soon discarded. The Italian troops were universally poorly equipped, led and supplied. I do not fault them for surrendering at the first opportunity.