Archive for Pistols

Nambu Type-14 Magazines

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , , on March 1, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_Japan.svgI understand, from my friend Andrew, that importing is a slippery slope. If so, I just fell down it. I have a Japanese Nambu Type-14 pistol coming from the States and while I wait I have been gathering the bits and pieces to put together a full kit.

In this case we have two magazines made by the Toriimatsu arsenal. I also found 44 rounds of wartime ammo, no headstamp which I am told is correct.

1944 Breakaway P38 Holster & Magazine

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , , , , on June 10, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgThis is the holster that I just sourced for my 1944 Walther P38 pictured below. By 1944 they had pretty much stopped making hard shell holsters (they do exist). Instead they supplied the pistol with a breakaway style holster as here. Folks call them a soft shell holster but that is incorrect.

This example is stamped bla 1944 and has the waffenamt WaA159. BLA is the code for the manufacturer E.G.Leuner GMBH in Bautzen. Interestingly the holster is also personalised to the U.S. Army soldier who captured it (or won it in a card game). Inside the flap is the name Henry J. Lavrich and his ASN 33688587. A quick googling reveals that Henry came from Pennsylvania, enlisted in 1943 and served in the 2nd Armoured Division in Europe. He passed away in 2011. An additional modification on this example is the cutting away of the upper, underneath the flap. This is common in these holsters and I expect it was an act by the user to make the holster easier to draw from.

The holster also contains a e/359 stamped magazine which is the correct magazine for this pistol.

German Walther P38 Pistol

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , on May 28, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgHere is the last Walther P38 semi-automatic pistol I needed for my accumulation. I wanted one made by each of the three manufacturers, Walther, Mauser and Spreewerk. This one is marked AC44 meaning it was manufactured by Walther in 1944. It also is well stamped with the E/WaA359 acceptance stamps for Walther. My Mauser made one is here, my Spreewerk one is here. Now I have to find another 359 marked magazine for it and a holster. By this stage in the war the Jerries had pretty much stopped making the hard shell holsters and this would have come with a breakaway soft holster.

Spreewerk P38 Magazines

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , , on April 24, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgIn my current quest to put together a complete set of the three P38 manufacturers, here’s something simple. A pair of WaA88 marked magazines. These go with this pistol here. Spreewerk was the lowest count manufacturer of P38 pistols yet surprisingly they are probably one of the most common up here in Canada.

rsz_p38mags

1943 P38 Holster

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , , on March 15, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgNothing too exciting here. This is a 1943 dated hardshell holster I picked up to match the Mauser made P38 pistol below. This holster is stamped GXY 43 for the manufacturer Klinge, Gebr., Lederwarn-Fabrik, Dresden.

Walther P38 Semi-Automatic Pistol

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , on March 12, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgThis is my second Walther P38 Semi-Automatic Pistol. This one is stamped BYF43 indicating it was manufactured by Mauser at the Oberndorf, Baden-Württemberg plant in 1943. It’s marked with an eagle over 135 (E/135) indicating manufacture earlier in 1943. Later in the year they changed to an eagle over WaA135 (E/WaA135). It came with an E/135 marked magazine. One of my other P38s, a Spreewerk, can be found here. My Walther made one is here.

Mauser Red-9 Shoulder Stock

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , , , on September 5, 2015 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_German_EmpireA little while back I picked up a Red-9 Mauser C96 (see below). I only got it because I liked the quirkiness of the setup for the wooden shoulder stock. So I immediately started looking for a wooden holster to match. Doing my research I discovered a few tell tales that would be useful for someone else looking for the same thing. In this case, the original stocks always had the tensioning screw end up at an angle 20 or 30 degrees off true. The Red-9 stocks had the squared off grain on the thumb release and this is always perpendicular to the edge of the lid. And finally these stocks were supplied without the metal loop at the hinge. If your stock has a loop then it is likely a bolo stock and post-war. It’s important to get the right holster as the wood that was removed from inside the cap was different to conform with the cocking lever setup. In the Red-9 series these were always the small ring style thumb grip.