Archive for Pistols

C96 M30 Broomhandle Mauser

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , on June 29, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgFlag_of_the_Republic_of_ChinaThis is a M30 variant of the Mauser C96 semi-automatic pistol in 7.3mm calibre. The serial number of this example puts it around 1932. It has the three chinese characters on the magazine indicating it was for the Nationalist Chinese contract. The barrel is the standard 140mm length. Somewhere along the last 80 years it has acquired a commercial stock by Geha. Along with this one, I show below my 1920 regulation police rework with fixed sights and the short barrel. I would rate the condition of this one as tired, I have since cleaned it with a copper brush and it’s looking a lot better, but the ex-China ones are always beaters.

Japanese Type-14 Nambu Pistol

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , on April 16, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_Japan.svgThis is the Nambu Type-14 semi-automatic pistol. This pistol was produced from 1925 until 1945. This example has the digits 19.5 stamped into the frame. This is the year and month of manufacture. In this case you add 19 to 1925, the first year of the Showa Emperor. This gets you to 1944. May is the fifth month so the pistol was produced in May 1944. The manufacturer is Toriimatsu and this pistol is from the second series. 1944 was the high point in the manufacture of this pistol so the 19.5 is pretty common. These pistols a terribly ugly and have a bad reputation for shooting their owners. The ammunition, 8mm Nambu, is almost unobtainium.

Japanese Nambu Holster

Posted in Holsters with tags , , , , on April 16, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_Japan.svgThis holster is manufactured to fit the Nambu Type 14 that I just imported from the States. The holster is made from rubberized canvas. In my experience Japanese leather was just terrible quality and little of it survived use. This material was substituted as it resisted the damp of the S.E.Asia battlefield much better. It’s marked with kanji inside but I have no idea what it says. I’ll be off to the internet to find out. The holster has a small pouch in the front for storing a 15 round carton of 8mm pistol ammunition. The cleaning rod is missing, something else for me to rectify.

The holster has two rows of kanji inside the flap. I am an idiot and have the photo upside down but basically the first row starts with “sho”, short for Showa, the emperors name. Then there is the kanji for the number 10 followed by a 5 or a 9. This would mean 1940 or 1944. 1940 is too early for one of these canvas holsters so it must be 1944. Then below is the mark for the Nagoya Arsenal and finally an acceptance mark.

Nambu Type-14 Magazines

Posted in Magazines with tags , , , , , on March 1, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_Japan.svgI understand, from my friend Andrew, that importing is a slippery slope. If so, I just fell down it. I have a Japanese Nambu Type-14 pistol coming from the States and while I wait I have been gathering the bits and pieces to put together a full kit.

In this case we have two magazines made by the Toriimatsu arsenal. I also found 44 rounds of wartime ammo, no headstamp which I am told is correct.

1944 Breakaway P38 Holster & Magazine

Posted in Holsters, Magazines with tags , , , , , , , on June 10, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgThis is the holster that I just sourced for my 1944 Walther P38 pictured below. By 1944 they had pretty much stopped making hard shell holsters (they do exist). Instead they supplied the pistol with a breakaway style holster as here. Folks call them a soft shell holster but that is incorrect.

This example is stamped bla 1944 and has the waffenamt WaA159. BLA is the code for the manufacturer E.G.Leuner GMBH in Bautzen. Interestingly the holster is also personalised to the U.S. Army soldier who captured it (or won it in a card game). Inside the flap is the name Henry J. Lavrich and his ASN 33688587. A quick googling reveals that Henry came from Pennsylvania, enlisted in 1943 and served in the 2nd Armoured Division in Europe. He passed away in 2011. An additional modification on this example is the cutting away of the upper, underneath the flap. This is common in these holsters and I expect it was an act by the user to make the holster easier to draw from.

The holster also contains a e/359 stamped magazine which is the correct magazine for this pistol.

German Walther P38 Pistol

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , on May 28, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgHere is the last Walther P38 semi-automatic pistol I needed for my accumulation. I wanted one made by each of the three manufacturers, Walther, Mauser and Spreewerk. This one is marked AC44 meaning it was manufactured by Walther in 1944. It also is well stamped with the E/WaA359 acceptance stamps for Walther. My Mauser made one is here, my Spreewerk one is here. Now I have to find another 359 marked magazine for it and a holster. By this stage in the war the Jerries had pretty much stopped making the hard shell holsters and this would have come with a breakaway soft holster.

Spreewerk P38 Magazines

Posted in Magazines with tags , , , , , on April 24, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgIn my current quest to put together a complete set of the three P38 manufacturers, here’s something simple. A pair of WaA88 marked magazines. These go with this pistol here. Spreewerk was the lowest count manufacturer of P38 pistols yet surprisingly they are probably one of the most common up here in Canada.

rsz_p38mags