Archive for United States

Hitler Propaganda Postcard

Posted in Paper, Propaganda Items with tags , , , , on May 13, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_United_StatesAnother simple bit of propaganda, mocking the Fuhrer. Looking at the material that propagandists used to attack the Germans, it focused mostly on Adolf Hitler. He was characterised as being a carpet biter, portrayed as a monkey or a rat or, as in this example, there was a toilet joke in there somewhere. This looks mid-war American, unofficial and designed for the home front. Let’s say it together, Fuck Hitler.

rsz_hitlerbowl2rsz_hitlerbowl1

Slap A Jap Birthday Card

Posted in Paper, Propaganda Items with tags , , , on March 30, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_United_StatesVisitors to this site will have noted, perhaps, my rather retro-racist love for WW2 anti-Japanese propaganda. A common theme to this kitsch is the invitation to “Slap Japs”. It was pretty widespread to use this kind of disparagement of the enemy to build morale on the homefront. This birthday card, dating from 1943, is an example of this theme. Other examples are here and here, oh and here and here.

German Trip Wire Spool

Posted in Mines with tags , , , , on March 13, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgWell it doesn’t get much more dull than this. This small spool contains the tripwire used to set up the Stockmine 43 and Bouncing Betty mines as booby traps. The wire comes in two colours, desert yellow and temperate green. This one is marked YBW for the manufacturer. These spools are almost identical to those used by the U.S.Army during WW2 and postwar. The difference is in how the spool core is turned and on the code marking.rsz_tripwire.png

End of the War Novelty Panties

Posted in Toys with tags , , , on January 28, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_United_StatesIn the great tradition of “a serviceman and his backpay are soon parted” we bring you tiny novelty underwear. As the demobilisation of the US Forces got underway from September 1945 these troops, soldiers, sailors and airmen were shipped through a small number of West Coast ports on their way back through the system and ultimately home to civilian life. Along the way enterprising merchants attempted to siphon as much of the serviceman’s demob pay as possible and this little item is just one example of the methods they used. I find it kinda interesting because beyond the obvious puns being used here, it also plays to the fear of the cuckold and the “Dear John” letter that servicemen endured.

rsz_panties1

Hang Hitler Propaganda Toy

Posted in Paper, Propaganda Items with tags , , , on November 24, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_United_StatesMan this stuff just cracks me up. It’s a cardboard doll from, I would guess, the USA around 1943. The legs and one arm are articulated and if you hold the noose and pull the string, well Adolf just goes nutzi! Honestly, fuck Hitler.

Schicklgruber Propaganda Pin

Posted in Propaganda Items with tags , , , on October 11, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_United_StatesCheaply made and pressed out in their millions these little lapel badges helped fuel the American people in their struggle against the Axis. This example is labelled “Wanted for Murder, Adolf Schicklgruber alias ‘Hitler'”. This is a reference to Adolf’s grandmother Maria Schicklgruber who gave birth to Alois, Hitler’s father out of wedlock. Apparently Americans found Schicklgruber to be a more comical surname than Hitler. It also suggested Hitler was a bastard by proxy.

1944 Breakaway P38 Holster & Magazine

Posted in Holsters, Magazines with tags , , , , , , , on June 10, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgThis is the holster that I just sourced for my 1944 Walther P38 pictured below. By 1944 they had pretty much stopped making hard shell holsters (they do exist). Instead they supplied the pistol with a breakaway style holster as here. Folks call them a soft shell holster but that is incorrect.

This example is stamped bla 1944 and has the waffenamt WaA159. BLA is the code for the manufacturer E.G.Leuner GMBH in Bautzen. Interestingly the holster is also personalised to the U.S. Army soldier who captured it (or won it in a card game). Inside the flap is the name Henry J. Lavrich and his ASN 33688587. A quick googling reveals that Henry came from Pennsylvania, enlisted in 1943 and served in the 2nd Armoured Division in Europe. He passed away in 2011. An additional modification on this example is the cutting away of the upper, underneath the flap. This is common in these holsters and I expect it was an act by the user to make the holster easier to draw from.

The holster also contains a e/359 stamped magazine which is the correct magazine for this pistol.